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As we begin, we ask questions about the participant’s view of happiness and success, career and life values, self-confidence, responsibility, planning, strengths & weaknesses, and role models. It starts a dialogue between school members, students, and the family in relation to career planning. It may be implemented for the student as well as the parents depending on the chosen programme.

Learning Outcomes

School Members and Counselling Department:

  • Be able to understand the student’s inner world in greater depth

  • Understand how students, and those in their age group, think about and evaluate important concepts.

  • Increased communication between student and teacher within the school.

  • Initiation of the career planning dialogue between student, school & parents.

Students:

  • Evaluate where they currently stand in relation to career planning and track their development as they work through the programme.

  • Be able to define happiness and success from their own point of view.

  • Understand the relationship between planning and success.

  • Be able to better understand their strengths and weaknesses.

  • Nurture awareness of how experiences and roles models consciously or unconsciously affect them.

  • Understand that change and growth are parts of life.

  • Be able to think in a mindful manner.

  • Become aware of the importance of values in the career decision and general life.

Parents

  • Initiate communication within the family as the first step of career planning.
  • Sees where the student stands in relation to the topics covered in the module.
  • Sees the areas in which the student needs to increase awareness.
  • Reach a mutual understanding of the concepts necessary for effective communication and planning.

As We Begin Module Questionnaire 

As We Begin Module Report 

The module evaluates the student’s current mental standpoint in relation to career planning and adaptability to the future. The aim is to bring career planning into the student’s mental agenda by asking stimulating and useful questions. Where suitable, parents also complete the module which facilitates self-evaluation of their own perception and understanding of the student. Thus, parents become a part of the process and look from the same window as the student. The results clarify the possible problems that arise with the career decision making process.

Learning Outcomes

School Members and Counselling Department:

  • More communication between student and teacher within the school.
  • Better understanding of the student.
  • Understanding gained of the importance of concern, curiosity, control, confidence, and consultation within career planning.
  • A comprehensive and individualised assessment created and given that supports students to see the big picture.
  • The ability to help students develop strategies in order to prepare for the career planning process.
  • Students and parents identify the differences in their perspectives which gives an opportunity to support communication in the family.

Students:

  • Increased awareness and consideration of ‘concern, curiosity, control, confidence, and consultation’. 
  • Learns the attitudes, beliefs and skills that positively relate to career decisions.
  • Gains an idea about the possible obstacles in the career decision making process.
  • Encouraged to take responsibility.
  • Learns their parents’ evaluations. 
  • Starts to communicate with his/her parents in light of the concepts learned.

Parents:

  • Gains an awareness on the relevant constructs including concern, curiosity, control, confidence, and consultation and their importance on career planning.
  • Considers similarities and differences between themselves and their children.
  • Increased communication within the family.
  • Helps parents be aware of the importance of being part of the career planning process.

Mental Preparation to Career Planning Module Questionnaire 

Mental Preparation to Career Planning Module Report 

Decision Making Styles assesses decision maturity and various decision making styles. It aims to thoroughly consider the relationship between decision making styles and career choices, and to understand underlying dynamics in decision making. It evaluates the extent to which students prefer to take responsibility during the career decision making process. It is implemented only to the student.

Learning Outcomes

School Members and Counselling Department:

  • Consider the importance of decision making, various decision making styles and their role in career planning. 
  • Be able to understand the decision making styles to aid in the process of guiding students.
  • Gleans important information about the student using a comprehensive guide. This includes clues to learn the mental and emotional state of the student.
  • Learns tools to guide the student in the process of self-management in different domains in life.

Students:

  • Gains an understanding of different decision making styles and where they stand in relation to them.
  • Be able to understand the role of values, beliefs, and emotions when it comes to decision making.
  • Be able to understand the importance of decision making in life.
  • Be able to understand the underlying dynamics – such as psychological influences, skills and values – that affect decision making.
  • Discovers the relationship between decision making and personality development.
  • Understands the importance of today’s small decisions in affecting the near future.
  • Be better able to see and understand the big picture.
  • Be able to identify the areas to improve and change.

Parents

  • Understand who has decision making responsibility within the family.
  • Be able to better understand their own decision making styles.
  • Understand their role as parents and their influence on their children.
  • Identify areas to change with decision making within the family. 
  • Be able to identify the areas in which students can be supported.
  • Be able to evaluate and understand the importance of realistic and rational decision making.

Decision Making Styles Module Questionnaire

Decision Making Styles Module Report 

Who is in Control helps to understand the behaviours and attitudes associated with internal and external locus of control. It supports the understanding that having an internal locus of control contributes to positive attitudes and behaviours in career development. Internal locus of control is a prerequisite for a growth mindset. This module is only implemented to the student.

Learning Outcomes

School Members and Counselling Department:

  • Be able to identify the meaning and concept of internal and external locus of control, and their positive and negative effects during career decision making.
  • Understand the relationship between locus of control and career decision making.
  • Be able to support students in developing strategies to support the internal locus of control.

Students:

  • Learn the concept of internal and external locus of control.
  • Be able to consider the positive relationship between internal locus of control and positive attitudes and behaviours in relation to career development.
  • Understand the relationship between external locus of control and indecisiveness.
  • Be able to evaluate the relationship between locus of control and career maturity.
  • Be able to understand that they have control over their own life.

Parents:

  • Understand the concept of internal and external locus of control.
  • Understand the relationship between locus of control and career planning.
  • Be able to better consider the disadvantages of decision making on behalf of the children and advantages of deciding together with the children.
  • Be able to evaluate the extent to which they allow their children to take responsibility.

Who Is in Control Module Questionnaire 

Who Is in Control Module Report 

This module aims at identifying the influence of fixed and growth mind-sets on students’ attitudes, behaviours and emotions. It evaluates students’ perspectives of making mistakes and receiving feedback in relation to learning and developing. It identifies the challenges they may face as a consequence of their mindset, and the changes they need to make to nurture a more constructive attitude. This module is completed by the student only.

Learning Outcomes

School Members and Counselling Department:

  • Be able to understand the positive and negative effects of mindsets during the career construction process.
  • Understand the positive effects of growth mindsets on career construction and other aspects of life. 
  • Have a better understanding of automatic/limiting beliefs, and be able to change them to liberating ones.

Students:

  • Understand the concept of fixed and growth mindsets.
  • Become better aware of attitudes and behaviours hindering personal growth.
  • Be able to recognise that mistakes, instead of being avoided, create an opportunity for personal development.
  • Understand the relationship between responsibility and growth mindset.
  • Become better aware of conscious and nonconscious limiting beliefs and start to transform these beliefs into liberating ones.

Parents:

  • Understand the concepts of fixed and growth mindsets.
  • Be able to consider the relationship between mindsets and career planning.
  • Be able to better understand their child’s perspective on making mistakes.
  • Become aware of the limiting actions and discourses that may have negatively impacted the student’s development.
  • Understand the relationship between responsibility and growth mindset.

Mindsets Module Questionnaire

Mindsets Module Report

Leaflet

The inventory has been administered in the UK for more than 33 years and is not culture specific. The module focuses on the children’s interests and links them to specific career areas. Interests are identified by an online questionnaire, after which the children receive an English report with career areas and their corresponding level of interest, as well as a numerical ‘overall match’ value for specific professions. Additionally, the most suitable career areas are listed, with their requirements, supporting areas, comments, and cautionary notes.

Learning Outcomes

School Members and Counselling Departments:

  • Be able to evaluate the interests in the student, in line with career areas and their requirements.
  • Better understand the requirements of different career areas and what is expected. Be able to identify areas for the students to improve in order to be successful in these career areas.
  • Better understand the relationships between the students’ interests, abilities, values, and decision making.

Students:

  • Gain a clearer insight into what interests them.
  • Learn about career areas that match their interests.
  • Understand the factors which promote success in the listed career areas.
  • Identify their strengths and points for development.
  • Understand the relationship between suitable career areas, sectors and organisational structuring.
  • Begin to plan their undergraduate and graduate education by considering career areas from a multidisciplinary point of view. 
  • Understand the suitability of different career areas by focusing on life and career values.
  • For IB Students: Identify which IB subjects would increase their chance of university acceptance.

Parents:

  • Gain an understanding of career areas in line with their children’s interests.
  • Understand the interest level and overall match of their children to those career areas.
  • Identify the requirements of these career areas and their success criteria.
  • Together with their children, gain an understanding of the strengths and weaknesses to be developed.

TurQuest Career and Occupation Selection Inventory Report 

Cambridge Profile Inventory identifies the aptitudes of the student in seven areas: spatial (2D), spatial (3D), verbal, numerical, abstract reasoning, working quickly and accurately, and arithmetic calculation. The aptitude test results are integrated with the TurQuest report. The inventory is completed by the students only.

Learning Outcomes

School Members and Counselling Department:

  • Gain a comprehensive understanding of the various cognitive aptitudes. 
  • Be able to evaluate the relationship between the students’ aptitudes as shown by the test, and their career areas of interest.
  • Support students in a realistic way by taking into account their cognitive aptitudes and interests.

Students:

  • Gain a comprehensive self evaluation in seven aptitude areas: spatial (2D), spatial (3D), verbal, numerical, abstract reasoning, arithmetic calculation and working quickly and accurately.
  • Understand the importance of aptitudes in relation to career planning.
  • Gain an understanding of their own strengths, and areas with which to improve.
  • Gain an awareness of personal skills.

When purchased with TurQuest, it links aptitudes with the identified career areas. This information is provided in the TurQuest report.

This report:

  • Compares their potential career areas with their aptitudes.
  • Identifies how interests intersect with aptitudes.
  • Increases awareness of the concept of aptitudes.

Parents:

  • Gain an understanding of the relationship between student interests and aptitudes.
  • Understand the importance of aptitudes, together with their children.
  • Gain an understanding of their children’s strengths and areas to improve.

Cambridge Profile Aptitude Inventory Report